object(Joomla\CMS\Menu\MenuItem)#632 (21) {
  ["id"]=>
  string(3) "117"
  ["menutype"]=>
  string(8) "mainmenu"
  ["title"]=>
  string(8) "Insights"
  ["alias"]=>
  string(3) "new"
  ["note"]=>
  string(0) ""
  ["route"]=>
  string(3) "new"
  ["link"]=>
  string(41) "index.php?option=com_easyblog&view=latest"
  ["type"]=>
  string(9) "component"
  ["level"]=>
  string(1) "1"
  ["language"]=>
  string(1) "*"
  ["browserNav"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["access"]=>
  string(1) "1"
  ["params":protected]=>
  object(Joomla\Registry\Registry)#575 (3) {
    ["data":protected]=>
    object(stdClass)#578 (68) {
      ["post_image"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_image_placeholder"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_category"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_hits"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date_source"]=>
      string(7) "created"
      ["post_ratings"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_copyrights"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_author_avatar"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_tags"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_social_buttons"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_readmore"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_fields"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_nickel_column"]=>
      string(1) "2"
      ["pagination_style"]=>
      string(6) "normal"
      ["post_comment_counter"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_comment_preview"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_comment_preview_limit"]=>
      string(1) "3"
      ["featured_slider"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_slider_all_pages"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_auto_slide"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_auto_slide_interval"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["featured_post_image"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_title"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_category"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_author_avatar"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_content"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_content_limit"]=>
      string(3) "250"
      ["featured_post_date"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_date_source"]=>
      string(7) "created"
      ["featured_post_readmore"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_bottom_navigation"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncation_enabled"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncation_readmore"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_image_position"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_image_limit"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_video_position"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_video_limit"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_audio_position"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_audio_limit"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_gallery_position"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncation_chars"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_main_truncate_type"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_layout_maxlengthasintrotext"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_main_truncate_maxtag"]=>
      NULL
      ["post_include_featured"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_pin_featured"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["exclusion_categories"]=>
      array(1) {
        [0]=>
        string(2) "18"
      }
      ["includesubcategories"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["limit"]=>
      string(2) "-2"
      ["menu-anchor_title"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu-anchor_css"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu_image"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu_image_css"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu_text"]=>
      int(1)
      ["menu_show"]=>
      int(1)
      ["page_title"]=>
      string(68) "Insights | Private Client Solicitors Edinburgh | Murray Beith Murray"
      ["show_page_heading"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["page_heading"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pageclass_sfx"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu-meta_description"]=>
      string(177) "To view our most recent insights, click here | Our highly personal service reflects our culture, which is centred on integrity, trust & expertise. Murray Beith Murray, Edinburgh"
      ["menu-meta_keywords"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["robots"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["secure"]=>
      int(0)
    }
    ["initialized":protected]=>
    bool(true)
    ["separator"]=>
    string(1) "."
  }
  ["home"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["img"]=>
  string(1) " "
  ["template_style_id"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["component_id"]=>
  string(5) "10001"
  ["parent_id"]=>
  string(1) "1"
  ["component"]=>
  string(12) "com_easyblog"
  ["tree"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "117"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(2) {
    ["option"]=>
    string(12) "com_easyblog"
    ["view"]=>
    string(6) "latest"
  }
}

Murray Beith Murray is a leading Scottish private client law firm.

For over 170 years we have specialised in meeting the legal, financial and administrative needs of individuals and families, family trusts, charities and private companies.

Review of Scale and Concentration of Land Ownership

phillipThe Scottish Land Commission (the “Commission”) published a report on 20 March 2019 on the impact of the concentration of land ownership in Scotland with recommendations to the Scottish Ministers.

The report follows a discussion paper on land ownership issues in Scotland, a Commission research report looking at international approaches to limiting scale and concentration of land ownership and a call for evidence of people’s experiences of issues associated with concentration of land ownership.

The Commission sought responses from people who live and/or work in areas where the majority of land is owned by either a single individual or organisation or a very small number or individuals or organisations; and the individuals and organisations have the power to make decisions about how this land is used, that affect the whole community.

407 anecdotal responses were received in response to the call for evidence and the Commission has summarised their findings as follows:-

  • Most of the advantages associated with Scotland’s current pattern of land ownership can be associated with potential economies of scale.
  • Most of the disadvantages identified relate to concentration of social, economic and decision-making power, not simply the scale of landholdings.
  • In some parts of Scotland, concentrated land ownership is an impediment to economic development and is causing significant and long-term harm to the communities affected.
  • The pattern of market and social power in concentrated land ownership, has parallels with monopoly power in wider economic policy.
  • There are issues to address beyond ownership, specifically a lack of effective participation in land use change decisions.
  • These problems are not associated exclusively with any particular type of land owner – the evidence reveals issues across land owned by private owners, public bodies, NGOs and communities.
  • There is little or no method of redress for communities or individuals, where there are adverse economic or social impacts arising from concentrated ownership.

The report sets out the Commission’s initial recommendations as follows:-

  • Introducing a Public Interest Test for significant land transfers/acquisitions.
  • Requiring land holdings over a certain scale to engage on, and publish, a management plan.
  • Legislating for a new Land Rights and Responsibilities review process, to take effect where there is evidence of adverse impact.
  • Taking into account the effects of concentrated ownership in the implementation of the forthcoming Community Right to Buy Land to Further Sustainable Development.
  • Reviewing and investigating policy options to encourage a more diverse pattern of private ownership and investment.
  • Creating more robust mechanisms to ensure local democratic influence on and benefit from, land use change.
  • Optimising opportunities, through land owners reviewing the operation and governance of their land holdings, using the Land Rights and Responsibilities framework.
  • Implementing – in the immediate future – a programme of land rights and responsibilities good practice (Codes of Conduct).

The Land Rights and Responsibilities Statement was introduced by the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2016 and in terms of the 2016 Act is due to be reviewed by 27 September 2022.

The Commission has stated that it will now engage widely with stakeholders and the public on the findings of the evidence, the immediate recommendations and their wider implications for landowners and managers, communities and others, through a campaign of awareness raising, events and public meetings culminating in a land reform conference in October 2019.

The Commission’s report and recommendations can be viewed here.

Specialist Rural Property Lawyers, Edinburgh

At Murray Beith Murray, our rural property lawyers have considerable experience in land reform matters. For further information on the full range of legal services we offer, contact us on 0131 225 1200 or fill out our online enquiry form.

Should you have a Scottish or an English Will? Or ...
Your business and land registration

Get in touch Make an enquiry

Please fill out the fields below and we will be in touch.

Please let us know your name.
Please let us know your email address.
Please enter a valid phone number
Invalid Input
Please let us know your message.
Invalid captcha

legal award

Call us today 0131 225 1200 or get in touch with us via our online enquiry form