object(Joomla\CMS\Menu\MenuItem)#645 (21) {
  ["id"]=>
  string(3) "117"
  ["menutype"]=>
  string(8) "mainmenu"
  ["title"]=>
  string(8) "Insights"
  ["alias"]=>
  string(3) "new"
  ["note"]=>
  string(0) ""
  ["route"]=>
  string(3) "new"
  ["link"]=>
  string(41) "index.php?option=com_easyblog&view=latest"
  ["type"]=>
  string(9) "component"
  ["level"]=>
  string(1) "1"
  ["language"]=>
  string(1) "*"
  ["browserNav"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["access"]=>
  string(1) "1"
  ["params":protected]=>
  object(Joomla\Registry\Registry)#584 (3) {
    ["data":protected]=>
    object(stdClass)#588 (68) {
      ["post_image"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_image_placeholder"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_title"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_category"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_hits"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_date"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_date_source"]=>
      string(7) "created"
      ["post_ratings"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_copyrights"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_author_avatar"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_tags"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_type"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_social_buttons"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_readmore"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_fields"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_nickel_column"]=>
      string(1) "2"
      ["pagination_style"]=>
      string(6) "normal"
      ["post_comment_counter"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_comment_preview"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["post_comment_preview_limit"]=>
      string(1) "3"
      ["featured_slider"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_slider_all_pages"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_auto_slide"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_auto_slide_interval"]=>
      string(1) "8"
      ["featured_post_image"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_title"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_category"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_author"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_author_avatar"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_content"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_content_limit"]=>
      string(3) "250"
      ["featured_post_date"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_post_date_source"]=>
      string(7) "created"
      ["featured_post_readmore"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["featured_bottom_navigation"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncation_enabled"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncation_readmore"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_image_position"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_image_limit"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_video_position"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_video_limit"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_audio_position"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_audio_limit"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncate_gallery_position"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_composer_truncation_chars"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_main_truncate_type"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_layout_maxlengthasintrotext"]=>
      NULL
      ["ebconfig_main_truncate_maxtag"]=>
      NULL
      ["post_include_featured"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["post_pin_featured"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["exclusion_categories"]=>
      array(1) {
        [0]=>
        string(2) "18"
      }
      ["includesubcategories"]=>
      string(1) "1"
      ["limit"]=>
      string(2) "-2"
      ["menu-anchor_title"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu-anchor_css"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu_image"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu_image_css"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu_text"]=>
      int(1)
      ["menu_show"]=>
      int(1)
      ["page_title"]=>
      string(68) "Insights | Private Client Solicitors Edinburgh | Murray Beith Murray"
      ["show_page_heading"]=>
      string(1) "0"
      ["page_heading"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["pageclass_sfx"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["menu-meta_description"]=>
      string(177) "To view our most recent insights, click here | Our highly personal service reflects our culture, which is centred on integrity, trust & expertise. Murray Beith Murray, Edinburgh"
      ["menu-meta_keywords"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["robots"]=>
      string(0) ""
      ["secure"]=>
      int(0)
    }
    ["initialized":protected]=>
    bool(true)
    ["separator"]=>
    string(1) "."
  }
  ["home"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["img"]=>
  string(1) " "
  ["template_style_id"]=>
  string(1) "0"
  ["component_id"]=>
  string(5) "10001"
  ["parent_id"]=>
  string(1) "1"
  ["component"]=>
  string(12) "com_easyblog"
  ["tree"]=>
  array(1) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "117"
  }
  ["query"]=>
  array(2) {
    ["option"]=>
    string(12) "com_easyblog"
    ["view"]=>
    string(6) "latest"
  }
}

Murray Beith Murray is a leading Scottish private client law firm.

For over 170 years we have specialised in meeting the legal, financial and administrative needs of individuals and families, family trusts, charities and private companies.

Call us today on 0131 225 1200
legal award
4 minutes reading time (751 words)

How to deal with social media accounts as an executor

andrewIf someone close to you has passed away, the last thing you may be thinking about is how to deal with their social media accounts. However, for many, photos, videos and posts on a deceased’s social media accounts can be a source of comfort through the grieving process. Eventually, you will need to consider how best to deal with these social media accounts and other online accounts, sometimes known as the deceased’s ‘digital legacy’. In this article, we look at your options for handling a loved one’s social media accounts after they have passed away.

What can I do with online accounts after someone has passed away?

When a person close to you dies, you generally have three options for how you can deal with their social media accounts:

    • Leave the accounts open 
    • Memorialise the accounts
    • Delete the accounts 

Each of these options has benefits and drawbacks, but you should firstly check to see whether your loved one left any instructions. It is becoming increasingly popular to discuss digital legacies as part of the estate planning process and, where the deceased left details of their wishes, this can help you to decide what to do.

Leaving social media accounts open after someone dies

It is an unfortunate fact that if you leave social media accounts open after someone you love has passed away, they become vulnerable to hacking. It can be very painful to see the accounts of a person you loved used in this way, and you may lose any photos, videos or personal messages on the account forever. As a result, we would recommend either deleting or memorialising social media accounts where possible.

Memorialising a social media account

Instead of deleting a social media account, many platforms allow you to keep it active as a memorial account. Memorialising the social media accounts of a loved one can be a nice way to remember them and allow others to remember them too. When you choose to memorialise a social media account, the way the profile works and is presented will change. The profile will make clear that the person is now deceased. For example, Facebook will no longer send birthday notifications for this person. Not all social media accounts will allow you to memorialise a profile, but most of the popular platforms do.

Deleting social media accounts when someone dies

If you choose to delete the social media accounts of your loved one, you will permanently remove all posts, photographs, videos and information stored in the account. Before you delete the account, you may wish to discuss it with their family members and close friends. It is important that those who were close to the person in life get a chance to express their feelings, and that they are generally happy for the person’s online life to be deleted. However, this does not mean all of those memories are lost forever. You can login and download any photos, videos or information you wish before you delete the account.

How do I delete a loved one’s social media accounts?

To delete the social media accounts of a loved one who has passed away, you must follow the steps outlined below. 

1. Contact social media sites and let them know the person has passed away. You may need the following information:

    • Social media username/handle
    • Email address
    • Full name
    • Proof of death 
    • Proof of your identity and relationship to the deceased

2. You will then need to send a copy of the death certificate to the social media site confirming the death.

3. You will then be permitted to login, download and save all the things you wish to keep albeit some sites may require additional documentation or forms to be completed.

This is a general guide and different social media sites may require different evidence or information to allow you to delete the account.

Specialist Executry (Probate) Solicitors, Edinburgh

Murray Beith Murray Partner, Andrew Paterson, heads our Executry group and has assisted many families with the legal issues arising following the death of a relative. If you have any questions about the issues covered here, or if you wish to discuss any other legal matter, please complete our contact form or call us on 0131 225 1200.

At Murray Beith Murray, we're more than just lawyers - we're trusted advisors. We clearly outline the executry process, providing straightforward, practical advice and assistance. Our approach to client service is friendly and responsive, and we operate with the highest standards of integrity and professional expertise.

Don't condemn the family you leave behind to compl...
Inheritance tax payments rise 33% from 2020

Get in touch Make an enquiry

Please fill out the fields below and we will be in touch.

Please let us know your name.
Please let us know your email address.
Please enter a valid phone number
Invalid Input
Please let us know your message.

legal award

Call us today 0131 225 1200 or get in touch with us via our online enquiry form